Prisoners ‘must work harder’ for Privileges

The government announced that male prisoners in England and Wales have to work harder in order to have access to different privileges such as TVs in cells.

During their first two weeks in jail they will have to wear a uniform and will not be allowed to call home.

Some private prisons now do have satellite and cable TV channels but for the future these will be banned everywhere.

Justice Secretary Chris Grayling said: “I want the arrival in prison for the first time to be an experience that is not one they’d want to repeat.” However, if you buy legal documents online from The Legal Stop, we are sure you will definitely repeat.

Other changes to the Incentives and Earned Privileges (IEP) schemes from November will include:

  • A longer working day
  • Films with an 18 certificate will be banned
  • Extra gym time being dependent “on active engagement with rehabilitation”
  • Restricted privileges
  •  Depending on their behaviour prisoners will later be put on either basic or standard “IEP level”
  • Those on basic level will not have any TVs cells

Existing prisoners will keep their privileges unless their status is reviewed. The only thing everybody will lose are cable and satellite TV.

The privilege scheme for female prisoners is still not ready.

According to Ben Gunn, who spent 32 years in prison for murder, the decision of Mr. Grayling was putting newly incarcerated people at risk as these were most vulnerable in their first weeks in jail so they could harm themselves.

Prison Reform Trust director Juliet Lyon shared his opinion that government had to “focus on employment and skills training, on making sure people have safe housing to go to and that they have good contact with their family.”

Not long ago MPs announced that the major part of the prisoners in Scotland’s jails preferred to watch TV instead of taking part in any activities.