Police Records Fall in Crime

According to an investigation of the ONS (Office of National Statistics) police has certain targets to meet when talking about cutting crimes so they are massaging crime statistics.

The yesterday research showed that for a year recorded crimes fell by 7%.

ONS, on the other hand, claims it does not believe these records because due to a poll on the crimes in England and Wales 40,000 households across the UK suffered different crimes.

This led ONS to the disclosure that police in fact recorded about 400,000 crimes fewer than they had to. Police did not record minor crimes such as antisocial behaviour.

According to John Flatley, the head of crime statistics and analysis for ONS, the decision about which offense is not too low so that it could be recorded is often a “judgement call”.

“There are marginal instances where someone’s complaining about anti-social behaviour by neighbours and there’s a grey area over where that tips over into harassment and becomes a notifiable offense.”

Another statement came from Mike Hough, from Institute for Criminal Policy Research, according to whom the pressure on officers to record complains is nowadays not that big but that it was notable that judging by the figures that police showed the rate of crime was falling.

An answer on the problem came also from the spokesman for the Home Office who said:

“As the ONS highlights in their report, there is no simple answer as to why there has been some variation in crime trends between the Crime Survey and police-recorded crime. The two measurements were always intended to assess different things and have different strengths.”

The shadow policing minister said that the fewer crimes reported are due to the fact that the number of police officers and stuff was cut.

“The home secretary should examine urgently whether, as the ONS suggests, the cuts to police budgets mark a return to fewer crimes being recorded,” he said.