Jobseekers’ Work Programme Does not Help Disadvantaged People

MPs on the Work and Pensions Committee expressed their concerns about the government’s Work Programme aiming to find job for people who could not find one for a year or more. According to them the new scheme for getting jobless people back to work does not work property mainly for those at the greatest disadvantage.

The committee announced it had serious doubts about the fact that the programme was improving, mentioning the fact that homeless people, disabled people and such with alcohol, drug and other problems were in fact being ignored and no one was eager to provide them with an employment contract.

When the scheme was launched in June 2011 it showed a really low success rate. Critics opposed to it when they found out that it missed the government’s 5.5% target as it was revealed that only 3.5% of those being part of the programme found jobs for six months or more. Most of them have filled in a Job Application form.

The main aim of the scheme is to propose to its clients such positions at which they could remain for significant amounts of time.

It cannot be hidden that the latest data point out that the outcomes have improved for the majority of the people but disadvantaged jobseekers cannot say the same thing.

What worries most of the people now is the fact that job providers would give job to those with biggest chances to find one and will not care enough for the rest who are really in need.

Dame Anne Begg, who chairs the Work and Pensions Committee, commented: “It is clear that the differential pricing structure is not a panacea for tackling creaming and parking. The Government must do more to ensure that the Work Programme provides effective support for all jobseekers, not just the ones who are easiest to help.”