Tax Evasion Measures to be Taken – G8 Summit

G8 leaders agreed on new measures to deal with money laundering and tax avoidance. They include giving automatic access to information to their residents` tax affairs and a requirement that all shell companies identify their effective owners. G8 includes UK, US, Germany, France, Italy, Russia, Canada and Japan.

The main purpose of the new measures is to “fight the scourge of tax evasion”.

David Cameron hosted the summit in Northern Island. Another important event, which happened is the launch of free trade negotiations between EU and the US, which Cameron referred as “the biggest bilateral trade agreement in history”. Hopefully the future  legal agreement will be beneficial for both sides.

The Three Ts – Tax, Trade and Transparency – this is placed at the top of the UK agenda, for its presidency of G8

The summit was overshadowed by the conflict in Syria and Vladimir Putin called for talks for Syrian peace to be held in Geneva  as soon as possible, which was discussed, however no for the Geneva talks was given, and the statement made no mention of what role Mr Assad could play in the future

The summit has been overshadowed by the conflict in Syria.

The G8 leaders – including Russian President Vladimir Putin, an ally of Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad – backed calls for Syrian peace talks to be held in Geneva “as soon as possible”.

All G8 leaders agreed on that transparency is required for multinational companies, which should tell the authorities what tax they have paid and where.  ”Countries should change rules that let companies shift their profits across borders to avoid taxes,” the communique said. It follows revelations about the ways in which several major firms – including Google, Apple, Starbucks and Amazon – have minimised their tax bills.

Illegal activities, including tax evasion and money laundering, will be tackled by the automated sharing of tax information. Speaking during the summit, Mr Osborne said more progress had been made on reforming the global tax system in the past 24 hours than the “past 24 years”.

These and many other topics have been discussed during the summit.

Voting Rights For The UK Prisoners

Should prisoners be given the right to vote is the new question to be answered by the UK government. Back in 2005 the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) ruled that banning the prisoners from their voting rights was illegal, that`s why now the UK government is negotiating a solution suitable for both sides.

There are three options for the coalition – to comply with the ruling, to delay the decision or face a sustainable fine. It is thought that the government is now working on a draft bill, which will give voting rights to a limited number of prisoners. In addition, the decision is expected to be delayed until the end of November (which is the official deadline), as the police commissioner elections are due on 17th November.

At 2005, when this ruling has been announced by the ECHR, David Cameron said that it would make him “sick” to give prisoners any voting right. He also mentioned that in his opinion, this issue should be “a matter for Parliament”, but not  a foreign court”.

According to unnamed sources for Downing Street, the Prime Minister still believed that ” when people go to prison, they lose their right to vote”.

According to Tory backbencher Dominic Raab there is a minimal chance of fines, in case the UK does not comply with the ruling and no chance for the UK to be ejected from the EU Council

On the contrary according to Attorney General Dominic Grieve the UK must comply with the ECHR ruling or ” risk making itself a pariah state ”

However a government source told the BBC “It is completely untrue. It’s not happening. It’s complete nonsense.”

Which version is the correct one, will soon become clear, currently in the UK, only prisoners on remand are given voting rights.

At this stage we cannot discuss the prisoner rights to vote, however we believe that everyone must have the right to access our free legal documents.